Fluoroscopy

Fluoroscopy

Fluoroscopy is an imaging technique that shows a continuous x-ray image, allowing the Radiologist to view real-time moving images on a monitor. Often a contrast media (dye) is used to show particular features in greater detail.
Barium Swallow and Meal Examination

A Barium Swallow and Meal is an imaging study performed by a Radiologist. It is a functional study which examines the mechanics of swallowing from your mouth to your stomach and the beginning of your small bowel. It is used to assess any functional or anatomical causes of your symptoms.

Procedure: Barium is a harmless material which outlines your Oesophagus and stomach and is able to be visualised on x-ray.

You will swallow mouthfuls of the barium mixture as directed by the Radiologist whilst X-ray images are obtained. You will be given some gas granules to swallow in order to expand your stomach and enable this to be visualised. You may be required to lie down on our bed and drink more barium to complete the examination.

Preparation: To obtain the best possible X-rays, your stomach needs to be as empty as possible. Therefore, you will be required to have nothing to eat or drink for 6 hours prior to your appointment.

Post Procedure: You may notice you have white bowel motions for a period of time following the examination. Drink plenty of fluids and increase your fruit and vegetable intake to ensure that the barium passes through without incident.

Defaecating Proctogram Examination

The Defaecating Proctogram is an imaging study performed by a radiologist. It is a functional study in which the mechanics of defaecation are visualized in real time.

Procedure: The rectum will be filled with a thick paste which is visible on x-ray. X-rays and video images will be taken as you are asked to squeeze your pelvic muscles and then as you eliminate the paste into the commode. We appreciate you may be embarrassed having people study your intimate body functions but all staff at Bay Radiology are professionals who appreciate what you are going though.

Preparation: You may eat and drink up to one hour before your examination.

On arrival, we will give you a suppository to insert into your rectum. This should work within 30-40 minutes and will help to empty your lower bowel. You will also be given a Barium mixture to drink 1 hour prior to the examination beginning.

Post Procedure: You may notice you have white bowel motions for a period of time following the examination. Drink plenty of fluids and increase your fruit and vegetable intake to ensure that the barium passes through without incident.

Urodynamics Examination

Urodynamics is an imaging study performed by a Urologist. It is used to assess how your bladder performs under stress.

Procedure: A small catheter will be inserted in to the urethra and X-ray contrast will pass through the catheter and into your bladder.

The table will then stand you up and you will be asked to do various things to put your bladder under stress whilst x-ray images are obtained. Once the examination is complete, most of the x-ray contrast will be drained out of your bladder before the catheter is removed.

The X-ray contrast is a colourless liquid used to visualise internal structures on X-ray, in this case the bladder. Most patients experience no complications of problems upon administration.

You will be asked to complete a Contrast Consent form upon arrival to ensure we are informed of any relevant medical conditions prior to the examination.

Preparation: There is no specific preparation for this examination prior to arrival.

Post Procedure: The x-ray contrast used is a very sticky liquid. We will provide you with toilet facilities to clean up after the procedure.

Cystogram Examination

A Cystogram is an imaging study performed by a Radiologist. It is used to assess your bladder.

Procedure: A small catheter will be inserted in to the urethra and X-ray contrast will pass through the catheter and into your bladder while images are obtained. If you have an existing catheter, this will be used to introduce the X-ray contrast.

The X-ray contrast is a colourless liquid used to visualise internal structures on X-ray, in this case the urethra. Most patients experience no complications of problems upon administration.

You will be asked to complete a Contrast Consent form to ensure we are informed of any relevant medical conditions prior to the examination.

Preparation: There is no specific preparation for this examination prior to arrival.

Post Procedure: The x-ray contrast used is a very sticky liquid. We will provide you with toilet facilities to clean up after the procedure.

Hysterosalpingogram Examination (HSG)

The HSG is an imaging study performed by a Radiologist. It is a diagnostic study in which the anatomy of the uterus and fallopian tubes are visualized in real time.

Procedure: A small catheter will be inserted into the cervix and x-ray contrast will be introduced under imaging guidance. The x-ray contrast will outline the anatomy and allow the Radiologist to assess uterus and fallopian tubes.

The X-ray contrast is a colourless liquid used to visualise internal structures on X-ray, in this case the Uterus and Fallopian Tubes. Most patients experience no complications of problems upon administration.

You will be asked to complete a Contrast Consent form upon arrival to ensure we are informed of any relevant medical conditions prior to the examination.

Preparation: HSGs need to be performed within 10 days of your period starting, ideally around day seven.

There is no other preparation prior to the procedure.

Post Procedure: You may experience some discomfort during and after the procedure as well as some minor bleeding. Please get in touch with your GP or referring Doctor if this doesn’t settle after a few days.

Contact Us

0800 467 4260

Call us to book an appointment or use the button to the right to request an appointment online.

Locations

Grace Hospital Campus
  • 07 578 0273
  • 281 Cheyne Road, Oropi, Tauranga
  • Monday - Friday: 8:30am - 5:00pm